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Bibliophiles Book Club

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Heart made of book pages

The Bibliophiles Book Club

Discussing contemporary fiction, with a sprinkling of literary nonfiction.

Meets on the Fourth Thursday of each month at 7:00 p.m at Books Inc. Campbell

Books Inc. Campbell
The Pruneyard Schopping Center

1875 S. Bascom Ave. #600

408-378-2726

New members always welcome!


 

White Fragility: Why It's So Hard for White People to Talk About Racism Cover Image
$16.00
ISBN: 9780807047415
Availability: In Stock Now - Click Title to See Store Inventory. Books must show IN STOCK at your desired location for same day pick-up.
Published: Beacon Press - June 26th, 2018

November 2018 Selection: In this "vital, necessary, and beautiful book" (Michael Eric Dyson), antiracist educator Robin DiAngelo deftly illuminates the phenomenon of white fragility and "allows us to understand racism as a practice not restricted to 'bad people' (Claudia Rankine). Referring to the defensive moves that white people make when challenged racially, white fragility is characterized by emotions such as anger, fear, and guilt, and by behaviors including argumentation and silence. These behaviors, in turn, function to reinstate white racial equilibrium and prevent any meaningful cross-racial dialogue. In this in-depth exploration, DiAngelo examines how white fragility develops, how it protects racial inequality, and what we can do to engage more constructively.


Killers of the Flower Moon: The Osage Murders and the Birth of the FBI Cover Image
$16.95
ISBN: 9780307742483
Availability: In Stock Now - Click Title to See Store Inventory. Books must show IN STOCK at your desired location for same day pick-up.
Published: Vintage - April 3rd, 2018

October 2018 Selection: In the 1920s, the richest people per capita in the world were members of the Osage Nation in Oklahoma. After oil was discovered beneath their land, the Osage rode in chauffeured automobiles, built mansions, and sent their children to study in Europe. 
Then, one by one, the Osage began to be killed off. The family of an Osage woman, Mollie Burkhart, became a prime target. One of her relatives was shot. Another was poisoned. And it was just the beginning, as more and more Osage were dying under mysterious circumstances, and many of those who dared to investigate the killings were themselves murdered. 
As the death toll rose, the newly created FBI took up the case, and the young director, J. Edgar Hoover, turned to a former Texas Ranger named Tom White to try to unravel the mystery. White put together an undercover team, including a Native American agent who infiltrated the region, and together with the Osage began to expose one of the most chilling conspiracies in American history.


The Tea Girl of Hummingbird Lane: A Novel Cover Image
$16.99
ISBN: 9781501154836
Availability: In Stock Now - Click Title to See Store Inventory. Books must show IN STOCK at your desired location for same day pick-up.
Published: Scribner - April 3rd, 2018

September 2018 Selection: From #1 New York Times bestselling author Lisa See, "one of those special writers capable of delivering both poetry and plot" ( The New York Times Book Review), a moving novel about tradition, tea farming, and the bonds between mothers and daughters.

In their remote mountain village, Li-yan and her family align their lives around the seasons and the farming of tea. For the Akha people, ensconced in ritual and routine, life goes on as it has for generations--until a stranger appears at the village gate in a jeep, the first automobile any of the villagers has ever seen.

The stranger's arrival marks the first entrance of the modern world in the lives of the Akha people. Slowly, Li-yan, one of the few educated girls on her mountain, begins to reject the customs that shaped her early life. When she has a baby out of wedlock--conceived with a man her parents consider a poor choice--she rejects the tradition that would compel her to give the child over to be killed, and instead leaves her, wrapped in a blanket with a tea cake tucked in its folds, near an orphanage in a nearby city.

As Li-yan comes into herself, leaving her insular village for an education, a business, and city life, her daughter, Haley, is raised in California by loving adoptive parents. Despite her privileged childhood, Haley wonders about her origins. Across the ocean Li-yan longs for her lost daughter. Over the course of years, each searches for meaning in the study of Pu'er, the tea that has shaped their family's destiny for centuries.

A powerful story about circumstances, culture, and distance, The Tea Girl of Hummingbird Lane paints an unforgettable portrait of a little known region and its people and celebrates the bond of family.


Small Great Things: A Novel Cover Image
$17.00
ISBN: 9780345544971
Availability: In Stock Now - Click Title to See Store Inventory. Books must show IN STOCK at your desired location for same day pick-up.
Published: Ballantine Books - February 20th, 2018

Inaugural meeting! August 23rd at 7PM. 

August Selection#1 NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER - With richly layered characters and a gripping moral dilemma that will lead readers to question everything they know about privilege, power, and race, Small Great Things is the stunning new page-turner from Jodi Picoult.

SOON TO BE A MAJOR MOTION PICTURE

"[Picoult] offers a thought-provoking examination of racism in America today, both overt and subtle. Her many readers will find much to discuss in the pages of this topical, moving book."--Booklist (starred review)

Ruth Jefferson is a labor and delivery nurse at a Connecticut hospital with more than twenty years' experience. During her shift, Ruth begins a routine checkup on a newborn, only to be told a few minutes later that she's been reassigned to another patient. The parents are white supremacists and don't want Ruth, who is African American, to touch their child. The hospital complies with their request, but the next day, the baby goes into cardiac distress while Ruth is alone in the nursery. Does she obey orders or does she intervene?

Ruth hesitates before performing CPR and, as a result, is charged with a serious crime. Kennedy McQuarrie, a white public defender, takes her case but gives unexpected advice: Kennedy insists that mentioning race in the courtroom is not a winning strategy. Conflicted by Kennedy's counsel, Ruth tries to keep life as normal as possible for her family--especially her teenage son--as the case becomes a media sensation. As the trial moves forward, Ruth and Kennedy must gain each other's trust, and come to see that what they've been taught their whole lives about others--and themselves--might be wrong.

With incredible empathy, intelligence, and candor, Jodi Picoult tackles race, privilege, prejudice, justice, and compassion--and doesn't offer easy answers. Small Great Things is a remarkable achievement from a writer at the top of her game.