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While I first read this series a couple years ago, with the recent release of Out of Sight, Out of Time (book 5) I thought I revisited the previous books to reacquaint myself with the series before I tackle the newest book 

Cammie Morgan goes to Gallagher Academy for Exceptional Young Women in Roseville, Virginia where her mom is the headmistress. Sounds like a posh school for spoiled rich heiresses, right?  That’s where you are wrong. Gallagher Academy is a spy school for girls where the teachers teach their students to hack into the CIA and dismantle dirty bombs. While each book has their own plotline, the overarching story for the series deals with the mystery surrounding Cammie’s father disappearance when she was a little girl. 
 

Rereading the series has been fun and it is still full of sass, fun and kick-ass moments (and I mean that literally). I love the series’ emphasizes on strong female characters and friendships as well as Carter’s wit that keeps me laughing at various intervals. Well-paced and witty, this series reads like a movie. Great for a reluctant reader. Also its squeaky-clean romance makes it a good novel for middle and high schoolers looking for a novel that’s more fun than mushy. 

Book One: I’d Tell You I Love You But Then I’ve Have to Kill You
Book Two: Cross My Heart and Hope to Spy
Book Three: Don’t Judge a Girl by Her Cover
Book Four: Only the Good Spy Young
Book Five: Out of Sight, Out of Time

- Reviewed by Connie from Books Inc. Opera Plaza
 

workshop to be led by NYMBC lady (Maggie)
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I tutor a thirteen year old in creative writing, and given my job and our relationship we obviously talk about books. A lot. And we recommend each other a lot of books. And I have to admit, since she will likely read this review and will call me out if I don’t admit, that she reads far more of the books I recommend to her than I read of what she recommends to me. Which isn’t fair or right, but it’s the occupational hazard of a bookseller that you’re never reading all the books that have been recommended to you by anyone, no matter how much you respect their opinion.

After a solid year of having NOT read a few of the books she’s recommended to me, she said: “Ok, fine,” in a very adult voice. “If you’re only going to read one of the books I recommend to you,” (and here she gave me a look as if to say, ‘I’m letting you off easy, you slacker’) “You HAVE to read the Knife of Never Letting Go.”

I asked her why. “Because it’s IMPORTANT,” she said.

Well. Clearly I had to read it. Immediately.

And she was totally right.

The Knife of Never Letting Go is the first in the Chaos Walking Trilogy from British author Patrick Ness. It came out several years ago in the US, and I even remember picking it up and thinking, I really ought to read this, and then of course, not doing so. My mistake. Contained in the pages of The Knife of Never Letting Go is a story that is as exciting as it is full of literary wallop. I was constantly awed by Ness’s ability to not only move a story forward, at a desperate, thrilling pace no less, but to simultaneously endow his prose with ruminations befitting a literary (which is to say, reviewed by the NYT), adult novel.

As I read, I marveled in the echoes of authors like Cormac McCarthy or even John Steinbeck in Ness’s thematic content, and relished the emotional acuity of his narrator, Todd. And as I closed in on the end, I thought, here it is, here’s what Young Adult is: it’s coming of age. It’s got content not befitting the under 12 group. It’s upsetting, it’s relatable, it’s life affirming and it’s hopeful.

When I finished, I thought: I need to tell everyone about this book. So I hope you read it. Because that thirteen year old I tutor was right. It is important.

--reviewed by Maggie, Children's Department Director (and NYMBC lady)

 
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China Miéville has won many adult fans for his intelligent & outrageously weird novels like Perdido Street Station, The City & the City, & Embassytown which is currently up for both the Hugo and Nebula Awards. He also wrote an urban fantasy for middle readers called Un Lun Dun. His new book, Railsea is not so much a retelling as an affectionate parody of that bane of many a high school student's existence, Moby Dick. It is quite literary but playful, with vast molehills of imaginative worldbuilding & lots & lots of ampersands.

Railsea takes place in a distant and unrecognizable future. Humanity clings to survival beneath a poisonous upper atmosphere on rocky outcrops separated by the railsea, an ocean without waves & whales. Endless railroad tracks of mysterious origin loop & crisscross over the soil constantly achurn with enormous burrowing predators. Mr. Miéville has helpfully included his own illustrations of some of these cthonian terrors. How do you feel about naked mole-rats? Now imagine a colony of them, each one the size of a German Shepard & with the table manners of pirhana.

All sorts of trains ply the railsea; driven by steam, diesel, sail, clockwork, or good old-fashioned galley slaves. Some of these salvage buried technology from civilizations long past or incomprehensible artefacts left by alien litterbugs. Other trains hunt the giant moles and other beasts for meat and hides. Captain Abacat Naphi is famous throughout the railsea for her pursuit of the ivory-furred Great Southern Moldywarpe that left her with a cyborg arm and furious purpose. She will sacrifice anything and anyone to find and destroy Mocker-Jack, the Mole of Many Meanings.

Aboard Captain Naphi's moler, the Medes, is Sham Yes ap Shroop, assistant to the wise & gruff train's doctor, Dr. Fremlo (my favorite character). Sham is not satisfied with the excitement and adventure of moling life & moons over how wonderful a career in salvaging must be. After experiencing his first moldywarpe hunt the crew comes upon a wrecked train. On it Sham finds a camera memory card that sets him on a quest as single-minded as his captain's.  Sham is physically & socially awkward, simultaneously eager & terrified of the great wide world opening up before him. His new friends, the Shroake siblings bicker constantly in a manner reminiscent of any family roadtrip, yet this brother and sister salvor team are ferociously loyal to each other. The three of them and Captain Naphi are set off to the ends of the railsea seeking to make sense of their impossible world. Nope, nothing allegorical for teens there.

There are tons of brilliant ideas and deep thoughts to be mined here but I never felt beaten over the head and shoulders with A Message. It felt like spending the day with an utterly mad, brilliant, & dear friend playing with his train set. The language & structure are more challenging & weirder than most YA books. Perhaps teens who cut their teeth on Thomas the Tank Engine, then Lemony Snicket & Scott Westerfeld's <em>Leviathan<em> & are ready for something more bizarre & complex have been waiting for a wild ride just like this.

 

--Reviewed by Chris from our Airport Store (Compass) in Terminal 2 of SFO. You can find him across the hall from the Kiehls! An EVEN longer version of this review was posted on Chris's blog here

It’s been out in England for several years, but Scholastic just released the whole four volume Predator Cities Quartet at the end of May. This first book is spiffing adventure in the vein of Flash Gordon serials or the original Star Wars films. It’s a post apocalyptic/steampunk romp through the ruined remains of Europe. The cities that remain are all on wheels, moving around the continent looking for smaller cities to devour in what they like to call Municipal Darwinism. After London’s greatest historian hero brings back something awful and mysterious from the War, Apprentice Historian third class Tom Natsworthy and his companion Hester Shaw traverse Europe trying to get back to London and figure out what is going on. Ages 10+


--Reviewed by Steven from Books Inc. Palo Alto! 

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