Blogs

I am a huge, huge fan of almost everything David does. And he’s done it again. This book has a fascinating premise. The main character exists as a human entity but has no body to call its own. Every morning A. wakes up within a new outer shell be it male, female, gay, straight, white, black, fat, thin, functional or addicted. All is good and well until A. falls in love and has a reason to want to stop jumping.

David Levithan's writing is so, so good I could have read a book twice its length. And that is really my only gripe with the book. I needed a bit more time. Levithan has definitely touched me again, but this time more my head than my heart, which is not a bad thing. Very excited to get people of all ages reading this one.

--Summer from Books Inc. Laurel Village

 

With a conceit as mind-boggling, logic-defying, face-explodingly-original as that in David Levithan's newest, one cannot help but wonder... is David Levithan... a robot? Or a god? Point being, he can't be human. Humans just aren't that good.

But then, he HAS to be human. Because in the pages of Every Day is a story of stunning emotional acuity-- as sentimental as it is unflinching-- that could only be born from the inimitable human experience.

I read this book on a sunny day in San Francisco. I sat in Dolores Park and read it all the way through. Around me, people played frisbee, smoked, chatted, cuddled. They came and left. And as I read I felt a mounting curiousity and empathy-- because as strange and distant as we were, I could not help but feel that they, like me, would feel a kinship with Every Day's narrator, A. That they, just like me, would read A's story and think, "that's me, that's my life too, I thought I was the only one," which is the real feat of this novel.

--Maggie, NYMBC lady and Children's Department Director


You can preorder a copy here and meet David at our October 12th event!

You can also read this INDIE EXCLUSIVE extra Every Day story here!

 

Here is another fairytale world that has evolved into a modern industrial society. Once upon a time everything ran on fairydust, but the fairies disappeared from their floating cities; factories crank out synthetic substitutes that support industries and on the street it is used as a drug. Henry Whelp is a wolf, a despised minority, living in a boarding school for troubled youth because his old man is the actual Big Bad Wolf in the slammer for killing Little red Riding Hood and her grandmother. This novel is all about the seedy underworld of this fantasy city and the plot twists and turns looking for the truth behind fairydust. There is a hard-boiled noir feel here, heavy enough to be nominated for the 2011 Edgar Award, usually reserved for serious adult crime novels. (Ages 13+)

Reviewd by Chris from Compass Books SFO

The world-renowned Chandelier family has come to town put on the best show on earth! Night after night, little Rufus Chandelier watches his family of highly talented giraffes put on the greatest show in town, longing to be big enough to join them, until he finally gets his chance to be the star. Not yet old enough to take the stage, he nevertheless proves his worth as the show unfolds...as their ever-trusty stagehand! Clever, resourceful and quick on his toes, Rufus Chandelier comes to the rescue, saving his family from some sticky situations. Take note of the beautiful watercolor illustration, the hilariously quirky details, and Mrs. Chandeliers to die for costumes! Perfect for the shy and quiet kid who just needs a little encouragement! (Ages 4-8.)

By Sophie Iribarren from Books Inc. Chestnut St.

A beautiful, reassuring and deeply moving new novel from the Newbery Award winning author, Rebecca Stead—where When You Reach Me was a tale of metaphysics and choice, Liar and Spy is a questioning novel about the nature of destiny and games. This time taking on a contemporary boy’s point of view, Stead expertly negotiates delicate content with seeming ease. As in When You Reach Me, her prose is marked by deceptively simple structure, belying very complicated ideas. So for mystery lovers, lovers of spies and lovers of gorgeous kids writing, Liar and Spy is the very worthy heir to the When You Reach Me Throne. For ages 9-13

--Reviewed by Maggie, Books Inc. Children's Department Director

 This book is so much fun! It’s a bit of a satire of the superhero genre, but I feel it will also appeal to fans of the superhero genre as well. Five teenagers are kidnapped by aging super villains and have super powers forced upon them so they can become the next team of super villains. As the book itself asks, "How hard can it be to turn teenagers evil?" Good and evil, black and white, and all the gray areas in between are explored in this fast paced and witty debut novel. This book is perfect for boys but there are enough strong female characters to win over female readers as well. (Ages 12+)

 

Reviewed by Katherine from Laurel Village

 

I love this book!  I read it twice in two days!  The story and illustrations (pen and ink and colored pencil) are wonderful in this sweet tale of the friendship between two girls in the fifth grade.  The subtitle is: Research for the Social Improvement and General Betterment of Lydia Goldblatt and Julie Graham-Chang (the two protagonists).  It has great characters and laugh-out-loud humor and poignant storylines.  The format is a "dialogue" between the two girls in their own handwriting that share their triumphs and failures in their pursuit of popularity at school.  There are also TWO sequels: The Popularity Papers: The Long Dispatch Between... (where one friend moves away) and The Popularity Papers: The Rocky Road Trip of... (where the friends go on a summer break adventure).  And they include gay dads! What more could you ask for? (Ages 8-12)

 

Reviewed by Darrell Scheidegger from Books Inc. Market St.


 

I absolutely hated the cliffhanger ending of Eve, so when I didn’t have to wait long to find out what was going to happen next I pretty much jumped for joy. Once starts right where Eve left off, with Eve in Califia mourning over her loss of Caleb. As much as I loved Eve, Once really sucked me in while Anna Carey twisted the plot into so many different shapes I felt like there was no way I could predict what would happen next!

The relationship between Eve and Caleb is as passionate as ever and it really broke my heart whenever they were forced to separate. I won’t spoil anything for you, but I will let you know that I cried on way more than one occasion during this book! And the King! We finally get to meet him and he is as evil and manipulative as I ever imagined! I know a lot of people have been asking me what he wants with Eve, but there’s no way I’m telling, it’s way too good!!

I absolutely loved the way Carey continued Eve’s story. Sometimes, when I read the second book in a series or trilogy I end up with that “bridge novel” feeling, where nothing really happens in the book but the character moves from one point to another, only to set up the next book. Once was far from that! Every other chapter held a major twist or plot turn, and I was absolutely amazed by what was happening!

I loved Once way more than Eve, and I’m so happy I didn’t have to wait long! Sadly, now I have to wait twice as long to find out what else is going to happen!! Not once did I even think I knew what was going to happen next, and the story moved so quickly I was able to finish it in one sitting. I could not put it down!! If you loved Eve, you’re going to love Once even more! If you didn’t love Eve, or you haven’t read it, then here’s your chance to fall in love with Anna Carey and all of her wonderful characters! Lovers of dystopias, romances, mysteries, thrillers, and adventures will want to get their hands on this one! 

 

--Anna of Literary Exploration 

Pages