booksinckids's blog

It's hard to deny that there's a glut of books written especially for girls... so thank goodness for Guys Read! Headed up by former Ambassador for Children's Literature JON SCIESZKA (rhymes with fresca!), Guys Read provides the kind of lit the fellas can get excited about-- and we're excited too. With contributions from an all star line up of kids authors, like Mac Barnett, Jeff Kinney and Eoin Colfer who wouldn't be? For ages 8-12.

Books just don't get much cuter than this new one from Candace Ryan and Mike Lowry. Minimal words in this silly, super simple story make this book a must for parents with squirmy kids who just cannot sit still. Blessedly brief, with charming illustrations, Ribbit Rabbit treats readers to robots, playtime and a heart-warming set of bestest-forever-and-ever friends. So if you like Mo Willems' books, Bear in Underwear or especially the Socksquatch, give this book a go!

Ok, so not all kids are going to love Billy Collins... but don't worry, there are plenty of awesome poets who write especially for tots!

 

Orenstein balances humor, insight and empathy with apparent ease in this treatise on all things pink. Starting with (but not limiting herself to) the Disney Princess brand, (which began only in 2000) Orenstein critically examines the girlie marketing phenomenon, from the seemingly innocuous Dora the Explorer to the controversial nude Miley Cyrus photo shoot. Written with the practical and loving eye of a parent, Orenstein explores the possible ramifications of heavily gendered media in both the short and long term. After reading this book, you'll never look at an American Girl doll or Bratz doll the same way again. As compelling as it is hilarious, Cinderella Ate My Daughter is essential reading for all parents of girls, people who used to be girls and even people who were never girls at all. And written by a Bay Area (Berkeley!) Native to boot!

2011 is going to be a great year for kids movies... because it seems like they're all based on books! So while the Potter-files count down the clock until Harry and Voldemort's final duel, and Twihards breathlessly await Bella and Edward's wedding, here are some other books that have been adapted to to sate your literary viewing needs.

 

There are way too many cool graphic novels out there for teens today. Listed below are only a couple.

The Runaways by Brian K Vaughan (books 1-7): Set in the Marvel Universe, this series is about a group of kids who find out their parents are super villains. What ensues qualifies as a teen/comedy/romance/adventure story that fans of Maximum Ride will devour. Keep an eye out for cameos by Captain America, Wolverine and even a vampire. For ages 12+

Scott Pilgrim Series (6 books) by Bryan Lee O'Malley:

Erin Stead now joins the ranks of illustrators such as Robert McClosky and Maurice Sendak as the 2011 Caldecott Medal Winner*! (Pause for Applause) Written by Philip Stead, A Sick Day for Amos McGee is a tender story of reciprosity and friendship. When kindly zookeeper Amos has to call out sick from work, his animal friends come to him! Erin's gorgeous illustrations make this already charming story pop. Through use of limited palette and meticulously rendered pencil drawings, the visual world of Amos McGee is at once gentle and arresting.

Pre-holiday madness is in full swing at the bookstore, so there isn't much time for blogging book recs - but we HAD to tell you about one of our new faves. ANNA AND THE FRENCH KISS is brand new and it rocks. For those who like funny and romantic contemporary novels, this is a perfect choice. When Anna is shipped off to boarding school in Paris, she doesn't know a parlez-vous from a coochie-coo, and she doesn't much care - all she knows is, she is missing the guy that she likes and all her friends at home. But then she meets the Etienne St. Clair... who is very hot, but also very taken. Let the giddiness begin! This is a frothy, addictive and fun novel chock full of amazing voice - we adore it and hope you do too! :D
People are talking so much about the innovative (illustration-heavy)  format of COUNTDOWN, as well as the historical setting ( the Cuban Missile Crisis) they're neglecting to mention that it's simply a wonderfully written book. Franny's voice is fresh and convincing, offering insights to both the tumult of the era, but also the usual emotional swings of a kid turning into a teenager.  In turns breathless and immediate, but also mindful and poetic (Franny is herself a reflective kid) Wiles earns the buzz she's getting.

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