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Not Your Mother's Book Club Blog

Books Inc., the West’s oldest independent bookstore, started Not Your Mother’s Book Club with one big idea: to bring the best writers in the world to the best readers in the world. And we're not REALLY a club. That's just our name, and really, what's in a name? We're actually just an inclusive bunch of PASSIONATE readers who get to hang out with the coolest authors on the scene!
We throw parties, eat snacks and read, read, read, read, read...
 We also have a lot of fun ... and we invite you to join us.  
Yay books!

NYMBC's blog

Conversion by Katherine Howe

This book was so good, I found myself thinking about it even when I wasn’t reading it. It’s loosely based on a few true stories. One storyline is drawn from the recent story about an all-girls school near Boston where students started having mysterious fits, and the other is drawn from the circumstances which led to the Salem Witch Trials. And as if that isn't enough, the author is a direct descendent of three of the women who were accused of being witches during the madness in Salem. This narrative is split between two main characters -- Coleen Rowley, who is a student at the school where girls start having fits, and Ann Putnam, one of the teenagers who claimed she was bewitched. It’s perfectly written -- all the teenage voices feel authentic. Even at the end of this book, I was left wondering about the cause of all the madness in both storylines. 

-- Amy from Books Inc. in the Marina

The Museum of IntangibleThings by Wendy Wunder

Wunder’s Probability of Miracles is one of my favorite books of all time. Her ability to capture the fleeting, ephemeral quality of youth is both beautiful and devastating. Museum of Intangible Things focuses on Hannah and Zoe, two best friends who are complete opposites. Hannah is sensible, hard-working, and “average” in the looks department. She owns her own hot dog cart, peddling sausages by the highway or at soccer games to the locals. Her parents are divorced, her father is an alcoholic, and her mother is manic-depressive. Zoe is bipolar. She’s creative, beautiful, sensitive, carefree, and completely unstable. After something terrible happens to Zoe at a party, she drags Hannah on a road trip across the country. Along the way Zoe teaches Hannah how to truly live. Museum of Intangible Things is heartbreaking and real. I dare to say Wendy Wunder is my favorite contemporary author and she truly amazes me with everything she writes.

-- Anna from Books Inc. Palo Alto

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